Strathbungo Station

The Glasgow, Barrhead and Neilston Direct Railway line opened in 1848, well before any of the houses were built alongside. It ran from a terminus on the southside of Glasgow to Barrhead with the first stop at Pollokshaws West.

The proposal for Strathbungo Station, 1875 (Mitchell Library).

Strathbungo station was a later addition to the line, opening on 1 December 1877, and Crossmyloof followed even later, in 1888.

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Welcome to Bygone Bungo

Welcome to the Bygone Bungo blog. We aim to collect and summarise all that is known about the dear little place we know as Strathbungo.

Over recent years I have amassed a wealth of information, from historical accounts and swathes of records, to many timeless photographs. This blog allows me to share them with a wider audience.

Not everything is on the site yet; items will be added as time allows. Future plans include then and now photographs of the area, maps through the ages, and further articles. The database of properties and previous residents is already running – you can search through some 5000 landlords and residents from the late 19th and early 20th centuries on the Address Search page.

So if you have ever wondered about the history of the area, who built it and why, or who lived here, or you have information of your own to add, delve in.

Andrew Downie

Colin Duncan – family memories

Here are some old family snaps supplied by former Strathbungo resident Colin Duncan. He corresponded after one of his pictures, that I had been unable to attribute, was used in the article about the history of Strathbungo Station. Credit has now been duly given, but he also supplied some lovely shots taken at 33 Regent Park Square, and 22 Carswell Gardens.

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Barnet & Freda Shenkin

Barnet Shenkin was born in Daugavpils, Latvia in 1882, and his wife Freda Monfried in Riga, Latvia in 1892. They moved to Glasgow, and in lived at 25 Moray Place (now 52 Marywood Square) from around 1925 to after 1939.

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Interesting People

Regarding your spot about interesting people that lived in Strathbungo. In 1977 my family bought 39 Regent Park Square from the architect Jack Coia. Gillespie, Kidd and Coia an interesting architectural company.
Incidentally, No.37 was owned by the Kidds and I think they were linked to the same practice.

(Sincere apologies to Jonathan for not posting this earlier; it was submmtted in August 2019! One for future research, although it was actually Jack’s younger brother John who lived at 39 Regent Park Square. William Kidd died in 1929, so not sure what his link to No 37 would be. Anyone else know anything?- Ed)

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Robert M Stirling, Cabinet Maker

Robert Stirling was a cabinet maker, upholsterer, and seller of carpet and bedding who lived at 25 Moray Place (now 52 Marywood Square) from around 1897. He began in business in 1880, but all record of him and his business disappears after 1906-07. Mrs Annie E R Stirling still owned the property in 1915, but was renting it out.

The Post Office Directories also record J H N Stirling and Fergus Stirling at the same address and working for the same firm at some point, possibly his sons.

Previously he lived at 34 Leven Street in Pollokshields, and had a showroom on the corner of Renfield Street and Bath Street. Later he moved to Strathbungo and had his works at 1-13 Cumberland Street, Calton, in the Gorbals.

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Rev Henry Erskine Fraser

Rev Henry Fraser was the first owner and occupier of 12 Moray Place, until at least 1875. He was the first pastor of the United Presbyterian Church on Langside Avenue. The church opened in 1857 (as Langside Road UP Church), but was replaced with a new building by John Bennie Wilson in 1897. That church in turn became St Helen’s RC Church, a role it still fulfils today, on the corner of Deanston Drive.

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H E Clifford, architect

Henry (Harry) Edward Clifford was a local architect who lived for a significant period at 12 Moray Place, commemorated by a brass plaque on the wall.

Clifford’s notable local buildings include Pollokshields Burgh Hall, several Pollokshields villas, Clydesdale Cricket Club Pavilion, and tenements on both sides of the Cathcart Circle line; the red sandstone tenements of 17-57 Fotheringay Road, and the blond sandstone tenements of 44-88 Terregles Road, extending round into Shields Road. He designed Titwood Parish Church on Glencairn Drive, but later taken down and rebuilt as St James’, Pollok. He also created a number of buildings in Campbeltown.

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The Victoria Infirmary 1890-2015

The Victoria Infirmary finally closed to the public on 22nd May 2015, after 125 years service to the Southside of Glasgow. The A&E department had locked its doors a week earlier at 8am on Saturday 16th May, and during the week the remaining patients, staff and equipment were moved to their new home in the Queen Elizabeth University Hospital.

The full history of the Infirmary can be found in the account published by NHS GGC at the time:

To mark five years since the closure, the following gallery is a collection of photographs taken on that final day, showing both the sorry state of some parts of the ageing building, and the affection in which it was held by the staff who worked there.

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World War 2 Roll of Honour – Strathbungo’s fallen

In 2017 on Armistice day I wrote of Corporal Aitken, a former resident of my house who gave his life at the Battle of Loos in the Great War.

Glasgow honoured all its fallen in a Roll of Honour published in 1922, and from this I put together a Roll of Honour for Strathbungo, published on Armistice Day in 2019, 101 years after the war ended.

For World War 2, VE Day marked Victory in Europe on 8th May 1945, and so for the 75th anniversay of VE Day I have compiled the Roll of Honour for Strathbungo’s fallen of WW2. The following is a list of those linked to Strathbungo who gave their lives, sorted by their address. Click on their names or scroll down further for a more detailed biography of each.

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Where am I?

A collection of then and now photographs of Strathbungo and the surrounding area. See how many you can spot, before dragging the slider to reveal. When done, hit the Reveal button for more info. More to come. Enjoy!

Where is this street scene?

Can you name the street? Look carefully and you can see a railway footbridge at the far end.

Drag the little slider from the right to see a more recent view.


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The Great War Roll of Honour – Strathbungo’s fallen

In 2017 on Armistice day I wrote of Corporal Aitken, a former resident of my house who gave his life at the Battle of Loos in the Great War.

Glasgow honoured all its fallen in a Roll of Honour published in 1922. It is available to view at City Chambers, with a copy in the Mitchell Library, and on line. It may not be entirely accurate or complete, but it has enabled me to compile a Roll of Honour for Strathbungo. Over 60 local men gave their lives during the First World War, and they are listed below.

With research I have managed to learn a little more about some of them, and include their biographies. Many are taken in part from local projects to research church and school memorials, notably those on the Pollokshields Heritage site.

A similar Roll exists for the Second World War; I hope to reproduce it here in time for the 75th anniversary of VE Day in 2020.

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