Category: Architecture (page 1 of 2)

Interesting People

Regarding your spot about interesting people that lived in Strathbungo. In 1977 my family bought 39 Regent Park Square from the architect Jack Coia. Gillespie, Kidd and Coia an interesting architectural company.
Incidentally, No.37 was owned by the Kidds and I think they were linked to the same practice.

(Sincere apologies to Jonathan for not posting this earlier; it was submmtted in August 2019! One for future research, although it was actually Jack’s younger brother John who lived at 39 Regent Park Square. William Kidd died in 1929, so not sure what his link to No 37 would be. Anyone else know anything?- Ed)

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H E Clifford, architect

Henry (Harry) Edward Clifford was a local architect who lived for a significant period at 12 Moray Place, commemorated by a brass plaque on the wall.

Clifford’s notable local buildings include Pollokshields Burgh Hall, several Pollokshields villas, Clydesdale Cricket Club Pavilion, and tenements on both sides of the Cathcart Circle line; the red sandstone tenements of 17-57 Fotheringay Road, and the blond sandstone tenements of 44-88 Terregles Road, extending round into Shields Road. He designed Titwood Parish Church on Glencairn Drive, but later taken down and rebuilt as St James’, Pollok. He also created a number of buildings in Campbeltown.

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Where am I?

A collection of then and now photographs of Strathbungo and the surrounding area. See how many you can spot, before dragging the slider to reveal. When done, hit the Reveal button for more info. More to come. Enjoy!

Where is this street scene?

Can you name the street? Look carefully and you can see a railway footbridge at the far end.

Drag the little slider from the right to see a more recent view.


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Frederick Selby, Architect

Frederick Selby was an architect who lived at 48 Queen Square in the 1970s, and contributed an entry into a Strathbungo Society competition for a monument to Alexander “Greek” Thomson in 1975.

So who was he? Well, not Fred Selby, for starters.

He was a tutor at Glasgow School of Art, and they provide us with a biography of the man.

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Pollokshields West Railway Station

This Where am I? entry provoked responses split 50:50 between this being Pollokshields West or Maxwell Park. So here’s some more evidence.

Although only Maxwell Park Station building survives after a careful restoration, it wasn’t the only island station house on the line. Pollokshields West had a station house of the same design, as seen here, until the late 1980s.

Pollokshields West Station seen from the Terregles Avenue entrance, in 1987 (Ewan Crawford, Railscot), and again in 2018 .

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Strathbungo’s fountain

Recently Douglas Robertson posted a query on the Bungoblog – did anyone else remember the Victorian drinking fountain on the Nithsdale Road roundabout, opposite Salisbury Quadrant?

“I’m sure it was Victorian, as made of metal and was substantially built. I don’t know the dimensions but would estimate (from memory) that it was approx. 10-12 ft high on a circular base of slightly larger dimensions.

It was situated on a roundabout opposite the old red telephone box nr. Sammy Dows and The New Anand Restaurant. I am sure it was still there about 20 years ago when I lived in Pollokshields. Did anyone see it being dismantled? Where did it finally end up? I have searched and searched (google uk) and cant find anything relating to it. I’m sure there must be someone, perhaps a Glasgow Council dept., who could throw some light on this. Again, a photo of it from someone would be an ideal start.”

A couple of residents replied, recalling the time the council came and took it away, or destroyed it when the new roundabout was constructed, probably in the mid 1970s.

Then the Strathbungo Society’s chair flagged it up to @OssianLore on Twitter , and the following is a summary of what he discovered.

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The Picture House, Campbeltown

On a recent trip round the Mull of Kintyre, I visited Campbeltown for the first time. Wandering around in the late evening, I came across the Picture House, Campbeltown’s cinema. It was built in the Glasgow School Art Nouveau style in 1913, and has recently undergone restoration. It is believed to be the oldest purpose built cinema in Scotland still in business.

What caught my eye was the information board outside the library next door. The cinema’s architect was one Albert Victor Gardner, a name I recognised. He built many cinemas in Scotland, especially in and around Glasgow, and continued to do so later in partnership with William Riddell Glen . He returned to refurbish the cinema in 1930.

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The birth of Strathbungo – George Washington Wilson, 1877

George Washington Wilson

This photograph of Strathbungo was taken by George Washington Wilson (1823-1893), a pioneering Scottish landscape photographer. After his studies in Edinburgh and London he returned to his native Aberdeen and began work as a painter of portrait miniatures.

George Washington Wilson, self portrait.

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The Consort Hotel

Residents may recall recent clashes between the needs of commercial businesses and residents in the Strathbungo area. It was ever thus. I found this newspaper clipping from the Herald, dated 18th October 1973, relating arguments over the licencing of the Consort Hotel in Moray Place.

The Consort Hotel?

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The motorway that nearly killed Strathbungo

I have long been aware of a story that Strathbungo was threatened by a motorway in the 1960s, and this was a crucial event in the formation of the Strathbungo Society, but I have never understood how this could be. The M77 perhaps? But that was always going to be further west. So what was the story?

There were occasional hints. A neighbour gave me an old article from Scottish Field dated 1977 in which Mike Stanger, then chair of the Society, described how properties were blighted by the planned South Link motorway, with no one able to get a mortgage, not even on 1-10 Moray Place.

A Society booklet of 1984 recounts the same story .

But what was the South Link? And why did it threaten the very existence of Strathbungo? With thanks to Stuart Baird, of the Glasgow Motorway Archive , we now know. Read on…

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